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hurricane Hurricane
roof deck nail gun

When it’s time to replace your roof, due to weather-related damage or simply age, follow the advice in this guide to improve the long-term performance of your new roof during hurricanes. Proper installation directly impacts a roof’s long-term performance.

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Asphalt Shingles

Shingles are the most popular style of roof covering. Whatever roof covering you use the condition and attachment of the materials are critical to roof performance.

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hurricane tracking

The coastal area from Texas to Maine is home to tens of millions of people with $10 trillion worth of insured property that is exposed to the threat of hurricanes. Building science research has identified the areas of a home most vulnerable during hurricanes. In addition to having your emergency supplies ready, know how to prepare your home for a hurricane by following these guidelines provided by IBHS.

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Business damaged by Hurricane Charley in 2004.

Many businesses are not prepared to respond to a man-made or natural disaster. Of the businesses that close because of a disaster, at least one in four never reopens. Small businesses are particularly at risk because typically they only have one location — the one that is damaged or destroyed. That is why disaster planning is a critical part of every business’ operational objectives.

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An example of a house that has shutters for opening protection.

Opening protection can keep wind pressure from building up inside the structure, which often leads to loss of the roof. Wind forces during a hurricane can quickly pressurize a building and cause it to collapse in seconds once a window or door is forced open. Protect your home using shuttered or installing impact-rated windows and exterior doors to prevent high winds and wind pressures from entering your home.

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Palm-Trees

Always be careful when entering a damaged building. If there is serious structural damage, contact local officials before entering. Report downed power lines or gas leaks. Keep electricity turned off if the building has been flooded. IBHS provides post-hurricane safety tips, generator safety tips, and insurance claim guidance to help you deal with the aftermath of a hurricane.

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research test

IBHS conducted the first high-wind test of commercial structures inside its Research Center. The test was intended to compare and contrast the high-wind performance of full-scale commercial strip mall–type structures; one was built using common construction practices and the other was built using stronger, safer wind-resistant elements. Actual high-wind events modeled after actual thunderstorm and hurricane conditions were simulated using IBHS’ 105-fan array.

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IBHS_HurricaneTesting_06

As part of the IBHS Research Center Grand Opening, IBHS conducted a test in which two full-scale, two-story, 1,300-square-foot houses were placed next to each other in the test chamber—one built using conventional construction standards common in the Midwest, and one built to IBHS’ FORTIFIED code-plus standards for the Midwest. Both were subjected to the same severe thunderstorm conditions.

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