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wildfire Wildfire
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Wildfires are a risk throughout the U.S. and pose a significant threat to buildings and lives in wildfire- prone areas. As more and more businesses expand into the wildland-urban interface—or WUI, a term used to designate wildfire-prone areas where homes and businesses are also located—the wildfire risk to businesses will also grow. In this environment,... Continue Reading
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Wildfire risks can vary from region to region, and are highly dependent upon the quality of state-wide and/or local building codes, types of building styles and topography. To address the unique risks facing property owners nationwide, IBHS developed a series of free regional wildfire retrofit guides which include a risk assessment checklist and a cost estimator to help home and business owners prioritize necessary retrofit projects. This guidance is based on the most up-to-date IBHS wildfire building safety research.

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Each year, hundreds of homes are destroyed by wildfires. The IBHS Wildfire Home Assessment & Checklist is a tool to help you determine how vulnerable your home and its surroundings are to damage. The assessment and checklist cover the areas of your home most vulnerable to wildfire. Use the tool’s cost estimator to prioritize projects you can do now, and plan your home improvement budget.

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Reduce the risk of fire damage to your home by assessing your roofing material and then take steps to improve the fire resistance of your roof. To help prevent fire damage to your roof, you should first assess your roofing material to determine your risk. If necessary, consider replacing your roof using fire resistant roofing material. If your roof has reached the end of its service life, it should be replaced. IBHS recommends hiring a professional roofing contractor to replace or repair your roof covering.

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FIRETEST

Burning embers are the most important cause of home ignitions. When they land near or on a building they can ignite near-by vegetation or accumulated debris on the roof or in the gutter, or enter the building through openings (an open window or vent for example) and ignite furnishings in the building or debris in the attic. IBHS developed the capability of simulating ember and radiant heat exposures on building components and assemblies at their Research Center.

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